• 25 FEB 13
    Extraction

    Extraction

    Tooth extraction is the removal of the tooth with decay or an abscessed that is so severe that no other treatment will cure the infection.

    Removing the tooth can help keep infection from spreading to other areas of your mouth.

    A tooth extraction should be done as soon as possible to avoid the spread of infection and more serious problems.

    Extractions are often categorized as “simple” or “surgical“.

    Simple extractions are performed on teeth that are visible in the mouth, usually under local anaesthetic, and require only the use of instruments to elevate and/or grasp the visible portion of the tooth. Typically the tooth is lifted using an elevator, and using dental forceps, rocked back and forth until the periodontal ligament has been sufficiently broken and the supporting alveolar bone has been adequately widened to make the tooth loose enough to remove. Typically, when teeth are removed with forceps, slow, steady pressure is applied with controlled force.

    Surgical extractions involve the removal of teeth that cannot be easily accessed, either because they have broken under the gum line or because they have not erupted fully. Surgical extractions almost always require an incision. In a surgical extraction the doctor may elevate the soft tissues covering the tooth and bone and may also remove some of the overlying and/or surrounding jawbone tissue with a drill or osteotome. Frequently, the tooth may be split into multiple pieces to facilitate its removal. Surgical extractions are usually performed under a general anaesthetic.

General Services

  • General Dentistry

    A good oral health begins with a good dental hygiene.

  • Orthodontics

    Aligning your teeth and correcting your bite to avoid problems.

  • Prosthodontics

    Nourish yourself by being able to chew and eat properly.